Metformin, diabetes and food interactions

Metformin Food Interactions

How Does Metformin And Other Anti Diabetic Drugs Interact With Food?

When you are taking any medication, it’s important to know what other life factors can affect that medication’s absorption and functioning in your body. Food is one of the most important factors to take into consideration. Consumption of alcohol is another.

Many types of foods, especially those that originate from plants, have various chemical compounds that interact with the enzymes present in the liver. These enzymes are also used by the liver to destroy and detoxify active chemicals that are present in the medications you take to control diabetes. It is important to know how the type of food you consume will affect your liver’s ability to recycle the active ingredients present in diabetes medications, as well as which type of foods can slow this process down as these will affect the rise and the dip of blood sugar levels.

How foods affect diabetic drug processing

How the food you eat will affect the diabetes medication you take will depend on what enzyme is used by your liver to break down those medications. This is an overview of how several known diabetic drugs are processed in the liver and how they are affected by the foods you eat.

Metformin

Also known as Glucophage, metformin is one medication that does not get processed by the liver. This means the use of Metformin cannot be affected by the food you eat.

However, consumption of alcohol does affect metformin metabolism. Excessive alcohol in your system will lead to metformin breaking down too much lactate which can cause one of the metformin side effects known as lactic acidosis. It’s a serious condition that is characterized by an increased amount of lactate in the body and can cause multiple negative symptoms such as trouble breathing, weakness, diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain, muscle pain, and tiredness. In severe cases, lactic acidosis can be lethal. To avoid any negative symptoms, it is best to avoid alcohol or limit it to very small amounts ( 1 drink a day maximum for women and 1-2 for men) while medicating with metformin. You will be even better off speaking to your doctor about risks of consuming alcohol in your particular case as well.

Vildagliptin

Also known as Galvus, vildagliptin is a diabetes medication that is processed by the liver with cytochrome P450. However, the processing is very limited. Through consuming licorice, grapefruit, ginger, or hot peppers, you can increase the ability of this medication to decrease blood sugar levels in the body.

Sitagliptin

Also known as Januvia, sitagliptin gets processed in the liver with the CYP2C8 and CYP3A4 enzymes. Avoid eating too much fruit and drinking fruit juices as these will interfere with the enzymes and increase the possibility of more severe side effects caused by the medication. When using Sitagliptin, you should particularly avoid consumption of mangoes, oranges, dragon fruits, rambutans, passion fruits, pawpaws, wild grapes, pomegranates, wild mulberries, and kiwis.

Pioglitazone

This medication is also known as Actos and is processed with the CYP2C8 enzyme. All of the fruits mentioned above (mangoes, oranges, dragon fruits, rambutans, passion fruits, pawpaws, wild grapes, pomegranates, wild mulberries, and kiwis) will also affect this medication so it is important to avoid them especially pomegranate juice.

Rosiglitazone

The CYP2C8 enzyme also processes Rosiglitazone, also known as Avandia, so it is also advised to avoid the fruits mentioned earlier. The intake of pomegranate juice will also cause this medication to produce greater side effects so stay away from the fruit juice as much as possible.

Food is very important when it comes to maintaining your body’s ideal health and well-being. Maintaining a correct diet and supplementing vitamins and minerals, as well as watching foods that can affect your medications should be high on your list of priorities in your quest to feel better.

Another important factor is following a healthy lifestyle, which includes: eating the right amount of healthy foods, maintaining regular physical activity and reducing stress.

 

Disclaimer of Medical Liability

This site is not designed to, and does not: provide medical advice, professional diagnosis, opinion, treatment, or services to you or to any other individual. Through this site and links to other sites, Metformin Facts provides general information for educational purposes only.

The information provided in this site, or through links to other sites, is not a substitute for medical or professional care, and you should not use the information in place of a visit, call, consultation or the advice of your physician or another healthcare provider. Metformin Facts is not liable or responsible for any advice, course of treatment, diagnosis or any other information, services, or product you obtain through this site.

DIABETES AND HEART ATTACKS

Diabetes, Heart Attacks and Metformin

How do heart attack survivors respond to Metformin?

Cardio-vascular diseases are a reason behind more than half of all deaths in diabetic patients. Heart attacks – fatal and not fatal – are fairly common in diabetics. Metformin, a common drug for type 2  diabetes, has been shown to be very effective not only in preventing the development of heart disease but also after a heart attack has already occurred in diabetic patients.

A study conducted in the Cardiology Unit of the Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute in Sweden involved a group of researchers that aimed to discover how heart attack survivors that were diagnosed with diabetes respond to different types of treatments, including metformin. In February 2011, the results of their findings were published in a journal named Diabetologia.

The subject of the study were 1,145 patients that were diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes and had also suffered and survived a heart attack. These patients were divided into three different groups.

  1. The first group was administered with insulin
  2. The second group was administered with metformin along with conventional treatment
  3. The third group was only provided with conventional treatment for 2.1 years

All of the patients were monitored for an average of 4.1 years. The study indicated that the number of fatal heart attacks during the monitoring period was the same in the three groups. However, non-fatal heart attack rates differed. The highest rate of heart attacks that were non-fatal was in the group treated with insulin. The group who received conventional treatment had the lowest risk in death from cancer while the group that was administered with Metformin both had low risks in death from heart attack and from cancer compared to the other patients from the other groups.

A more recent set of studies researched the mechanisms by which metformin is able to curb heart disease and help patients heal after heart attacks. The scientists from Newcastle University, Saudi Arabia, were able to create a model of a heart attack in the lab conditions. They were able to monitor the formation of the new blood vessels which is essential for the recovery after heart attack. They were also able to see that metformin enhanced the process of those blood vessels formation. Metformin has been shown to be able to lower blood glucose in the heart attack model, which is one of the factors that hinders new vessel formation. Metformin also was shown to activate a set of genes that help strengthen the new vessels and thus lead to a faster and more effective recovery.

This outcome is very promising not only in terms of using metformin to help diabetic patients who have survived heart attacks but also in developing new drugs aimed specifically at healing after heart attacks in a wider population.

Metformin, which is available in tablet form and is commonly known as Fortamet, Glucophage, or Glucophage CR is used to lower blood sugar levels. Individuals diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes commonly use it and it can also be used to prevent the development of Type 2 Diabetes for pre-diabetic patients. A Canadian study showed that the use of both Avandia and Metformin helped decrease the risk of diabetes in pre-diabetic volunteers.

 

Disclaimer of Medical Liability

This site is not designed to, and does not: provide medical advice, professional diagnosis, opinion, treatment, or services to you or to any other individual. Through this site and links to other sites, Metformin Facts provides general information for educational purposes only.

The information provided in this site, or through links to other sites, is not a substitute for medical or professional care, and you should not use the information in place of a visit, call, consultation or the advice of your physician or another healthcare provider. Metformin Facts is not liable or responsible for any advice, course of treatment, diagnosis or any other information, services, or product you obtain through this site.

Metformin HCl – What is it?

What you need to know about Metformin HCl

One of the more often approved medications in treating diabetes is Metformin HCl (Glucophage®).  It is prescribed to type 2 diabetes patients to decrease their levels of blood sugar. Metformin hydrochloride is the abbreviated form of Metformin HCl.

The effects of the medicine are as follows:

1) Restricts the quantity of sugar the body absorbs from a diet;

2) Lowers the amount of sugar produced by the liver;

3) Aids the body to react to its insulin by making insulin receptors more receptive. The blood sugar level diminishes with these results.

Today, Metformin HCl is a leader in the most preferred brand of medications for diabetes treatments. An on-going inquiry of the tablet is being conducted, and new benefits are still spotted. Because of this the number of ailments treatable by Metformin is getting bigger. Side effects of Metformin are also being studied and an on-going research is aimed at minimizing them.

The fact the Metformin HCl is included in WHO’s list of essential medications support the drug’s reputation and popularity. Metformin HCl is perfectly safe for humans and nearly found with no side effects with proper dosage. A Metformin treatment is prescribed by your medical professional basing it on the condition of your health and the severity of your diabetes.

The dosage of Metformin HCl is usually once to thrice a day. It’s available in a few types and potencies such as tablets, syrup, or two distinct types for long treatment.

As compared to other diabetes treatment, with Metformin HCl, the patient is unlikely to suffer from hypoglycaemia (a serious condition where blood sugar is very low) because it doesn’t cause an increase of insulin in the body.

Metformin Dosage Information

Your health practitioner may prescribe a specific dosage for you based on a few aspects such as:

  • The way you control your diabetes.
  • Your other health conditions.
  • You may need extra medications.

Generally, you are not supposed to change your dose without consulting your medical practitioner.